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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last several years litigating to prevent long-term isolation and to create benchmarks programs, access to se
right decides to make an argument that is insane, they jump on the civil rights movement or slavery and try to latch their argument onto the history -- >> yes. >> as if they give a damn. as if they would have been up at the front for the fight. >> exactly. >> you don't remember ted nugent standing in front of everyone m the civil rights marches. >> i remember him refusing to go to vietnam. i remember him getting out of going to vietnam and being afraid to carry a gun when his country asked him to carry a gun. he was a coward. these guys always jump on slavery and the civil rights movement. ths offensive. if slaves hadn't been owned by other people there wouldn't have been slavery either. >> this is what's happening now is something we've been talking about for five years. that is the extreme right, let's call it what it is, has gone on about barack obama as a socialist, as -- conspiracy theories about secret plans to take guns and dominate the country, and now because biden comes out and talks about high-capacity magazines they say finally, we finally have something -- >> nailed the
to be the civil rights case -- civil rights issue term, more so than in many past decades. >> pete, you mentioned the voting rights act there. specifically this deals with section 5, the preclearance provision. >> right. >> i have picking up from supporters of preclearance, i'm picking up on an awful lot of sort of negativity in terms of how they think this is disappearing to go. i guess roberts a couple years ago basically made a comment that things have changed in the south. >> exactly. >> we don't want to get too far ahead of ourselves, but if the court does toss section 5, what would be the larger impact on the entire voting rights act if that were to happen? >> the civil rights advocates would tell you section 5 is the real teeth. this is the thing that requires states to justify their changes in advance. the other part of the law would remain intact. that's the part of the law that allows anybody to sue a state if they believe it engages in racial discrimination at the polls. but civil rights advocates would say this just invites a game of whack a mole. that every time something pops up, th
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
devoted to civil rights, she'll deliver the invocation at the inauguration of our country's first african-american president. you kept your word. your husband did not shed his blood in vain. had it not been for him him and others, we would not be celebrating what we will celebrate at inauguration day. i'm glad that medgar and others will see that you kept the faith and the nation has grown. this is what america is about. making those that shed their blood not having shed it in vain. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> the folks that brought you the iraq war. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. the folks who quack for iraq have a knack for bad ideas. they pushed us into war ten years ago, they made their case with lies and half truths and flimflam. we had to get revenge for 9/11, so let's attack iraq even though it was al qaeda that hit the twin towers and the pentagon. we have to attack iraq because we've got evidence they have weapons of mass destruction, wmd, even if there's no
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
question my commitment to their civil rights. whatever chuck hagel's views were as a senator, if he does become secretary of defense, he will have to fall in line with president obama's policies on everything from defense spending to what to do about iran's nuclear program. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. >>> quiet in steubenville, ohio, today after days of media coverage centering on the alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl. both sides are preparing their case for a february 13th trial inform a case that has divided the small ohio town. the two 16-year-old high school football players are charged with sexual assaulting the girl last summer. the alleged attack took place at several parties over the course of a night and were well-documented by students who were there. the defense attorney for one accused teen spoke to our own susan candiotti and he claims a text message may be a crucial piece of evidence in the upcoming trial. attorney adam neeman would not show us the alleged text. the girl's attorney declined to comment on whether it was sent or not. >>> i spoke earlier with walter mad
to teach and practice civil rights law. and lead a voter registration drive rather than cashing in on his degree. i think those were fundamental choices for him. >> rose: and he was looking for a way to engage in public service rather than take an easy corporate route in high demand with high salary. >> i think he felt that the most rewarding life was one in which you could make a greater difference than just in your own realm, your own level of comfort. >> rose: i want to come back to him and lots of questions about him. but go back to where you are. so you are going to leave politics and just study. >> i'm going to leave campaigns. actually, it's sort of a causei academic position. because what i've done with the university of chicago is create an institute of politics much like the one at harvard and some other-- . >> rose: you mean like the kennedy school. >> well, the kennedy school is one thing. but the iop was something the kennedy school started at harvard to expose young people to practitioners in politics, to encourage them to go into the public arena as candidates, as strategis
people are. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. and maybe that trinity based organizations are narrow minded and to anxious to get the income grants and to build five units of housing. that is not going to change the system. that is where people are. for the last four years i've been working with the building trades. i have been working with them to the young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so they can become the workers. as conservative as they are, that operate 1200 job training centers in the construction grade. it is the second-largest job training mechanism outside the u.s.. guess what? there in a coalition filled with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts working together for the last four years to say "how do we change, how do we improve?" the national leadership has gone across 350 cities in u.s.. try to convince them that they need to change. this is encouraging. i think we have to do that kind of work. i think people like me would be justified in writing this people off. in order to change america and need th
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
of that and of the civil rights movement i was just a junkie by the time i was 9-years-old i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and when i was 10i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay running for the mayor of new york but i wouldn't work for him at the headquarters, i want to the liberal party come on new york you could run on to. i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york, and some woman felt this was cute this ely handing out leaflets, and she asked me why they make the case for lindsey and got an early start of my political career and made the case against the opponent as well. we to get back to the liberal party headquarters and open it up and there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills and so in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [applause] >> you also sold a bumper stickers. >> those of us that have lived through it remember that is a time of great idealism and the campaign was infused with idealism as tragically as it ended, and wh
pleased to announce that our administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. function.\and dys but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 90 miles can make. [applause] virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best state in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas where i believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens
members in the previous comment. an update on nelson mandela's health. the 94-year-old civil rights icon doing a little bit better. straight ahead -- >> what's going to dominate washington for the next threements here is going to be spending and debt. >> senator mitch mcconnell doesn't think gun control gets any movement in congress any time soon, but the white house may have something up its sleeve. we've learned a little bit more about what it's planning. we'll tell you about it and some rare unpublished color photos of the beatles first u.s. tour have been recovered. they are up for sale as well. you can probably get a really good deal on them. we'll give you a preview. this is msnbc, the place for politics and beatles stuff as well on sunday afternoons. . >>> here's a quick look at stories making news right now. doctors say former south african president nelson mandela is recovering well after being hospitalized for a lung infection and surgery to remove galstones and hockey fans, good news for you. the nhl announcing a tentative agreement for a new collective bargaining agreement wi
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
to ambassador hormel and any lgbt americans who may question my commitment to their civil rights. >> barbara starr is joining us right now. on that last point that you just made, i assume he is totally committed to making sure equal rights for gays and lesbians serving in the united states military will be fully honored, no going back to don't ask, don't tell or anything along those lines? >> well, that's absolutely right, wolf. when you are the secretary of defense in this country, you carry out the president's policies. this is mandatory. there's no choice on these matters. so by accepting the nomination and being willing to serve as secretary of defense, he will have to do this. in fact, many members of the gay and lesbian community are looking for additional rights to be granted to them when they are partners of either those serving in the military or in the military themselves. i think for most americans one of the -- besides all of the questions we've discussed here, what would lead to troops being taken into another conflict, into another war after so many years in iraq and afghanista
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
vii of the civil rights act makes it unlawful to discriminate based on gender. a distinction saying that women are the problem they should be fired or what the iowa supreme court found was that this particular woman is a problem because right or wrong, justified or not, she poses a threat to the marriage. and that was the basis for him firing her. >> what about that, what is the dentist supposed to do when he feels attraction for her, he's a married man and the wife says she's got to go and the law says you have to keep her in your employ? >> yes, it does and i'm looking at the opinion right now. the court absolutely got this wrong. section 2116 of the iowa code says it's unlawful to discriminate based on sex and may have a devastating impact based on sex. >> it's not. >> the cases that the court cited that you brought up had to do where an employee and an employer had a consensual sexual relationship. that didn't happen here so those cases aren't on point. >> would the position be the same, a male employer found a male employee too hot and fired him. >> megyn: hold that thought and
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
administration. i would also point out, wolf, that john mccain is on the same side as the liberal civil rights group the aclu in this. they are raising the same kinds of questions. even though in the past, brennan has said that he opposes these enhanced interrogation techniques. >> we'll watch these confirmation hearings every step of the way. >> should be interesting, both of them. >> low flying helicopters have people in some of the country's biggest cities asking questions. the answers have to do with preparations for a possible terrorist attack. using radioactive dirty bombs. >>> plus, before we get to that, we have some new details emerging about the colorado theater shootings, including the suspect's strange behavior once he was caught. uncer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
. in a statement, he said the protesters have the constitutional right to demonstrate. he also called on his partners to help preserve civil peace. but he shifted the blame on to parliament, and called on it to do with protesters' demands. but the mass rally seemed to have expanded. friday marked one of the biggest days of demonstrations that have taken part in the last two weeks in at least 15,000 cities across the country. they are calling for equality and the end to the targeting of zunis. when nothing less. -- sunnis, nothing less. >> a prominent shiite cleric reached out, to a mosque in baghdad. he also went to the catholic church attack in 2010 by sunni fighters. >> we have learned a big lesson from this church and our brother christians in iraq. want to return to peace than confront the terrorists who want to split religions in iraq. >> the leaders of sudan and south sudan are meeting in addis about a -- abbaba to negotiate border disputes. pseudonym and south sudan came close to war last year over the disputes. both accused each other of supporting rebels in each other's territories.
disarray. we're beyond division. we've got anarchy and very clearly defined tribal sectarian civil war in iraq. that's happening right now. but, most important, those men and women that we ask to fight and die, they deserve a policy worthy of their sacrifices. they, in my opinion, do not have that policy today. >> suarez: on "fox news sunday" last weekend, south carolina senator lindsey graham made clear that republicans have not forgotten or forgiven. >> i can tell you there would be very little republican support for his nomination. at the end of the day, there will be very few votes. >> suarez: meanwhile a group of republican and democratic officials have written to the president, expressing their support for hagel, and they're mounting a campaign with radio ads. >> i've know him since his early days in the senate. we have consulted and talked often about foreign policy. >> suarez: former ambassador thomas pickering is one of hagel's supporters. over a long career, he's gone through the confirmation process nine times. does this process that happens before a nomination and before a
civil society. one that is demanding better government. it did so a year ago regarding corruption and now asking for basic rights for women. in a way, this is india's arab spring. but it needs to sustain itself. and to lead to real reform and change. this indian spring will only work out better than the arab spring if its national leaders recognize the need for radical and thorough change in their country. up next, a look at the fiscal cliff deal in washington from the eyes of two great british economists and journalists. ack ! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in
's largest military machine, nato, right on the doorstep of this very brittle and brutal 21-month-long civil war. syrian regime shells landing inside turkey, prompting turkey's request to nato. that tension has died down. what has changed is the escalation in the conflict. rebels in the north pressing down hard on friday on a helicopter base, which they're trying to take to stop the regime's ability to project air power across the north. as the assad regime gets more desperate, many are concerned they'll reach into their arsenal, perhaps as the more deadly weapons inside, chemical weapons, which they deny having, scud-type missiles have already been used. purely to defend turkey, nato says. at the end of the day, as some say, they have skin in the game. perhaps were a shell to go astray, that may cause some ramifications for nato's patriot deployment there. all eyes watching this and certainly nato making the key point this is purely defensive. now certainly psychologically on what's happening in that border area. nick paton walsh, cnn, istanbul. >>> much more ahead this hour. >> here's what
admitted that he traveled to libya several times during the civil war but has denied any connection to the benghazi attacks. so right now nobody in custody that we know for sure was involved in that attack. frustrating for u.s. officials. >> so is he still being held? >> not clear whether he's still being held. right now it looks like there's nobody in custody that we're sure was involved at least as a suspect in that attack and it's very frustrating. >> a lot of work to bring those folks to justice. brian, thanks very much. >>> lawmakers here in washington want to hear from the secretary of state hillary clinton as soon as possible about the benghazi attack. we're just learning she will now testify on capitol hill the week of january 21st. her testimony had to be rescheduled after her bout with a stomach virus, a concussion, and later a blood clot in her head. let's bring in elise labott. >> wolf, it will be the week of january 21st. president obama's inauguration is on the 20th. it may not be exactly the same day after the inauguration. the committee staffers on the senate foreign
, the parties appeared to be in kind of a civil war, and donors are zipping their wallets because these don't like the party's direction. yet the tea party wing wants to push the party further right in some cases. what's going on with the republican party? we've got an expert. the former house republican majority leader and former freedomworks chairman dick armey. i will henceforth call you mr. armey. mr. armey, i'm a hill rat, and i always look up to guys that have been elected. i'm going to ask you broad questions, we'll narrow it down to freedomworks later on. what's going on with your party? i thought in that first debate romney had the number on the president. he's talking about spending, creating jobs, sticking to economics. he looked like he had a winning line, and then he went to benghazi and rape and rotten apple stuff. what should you party have been this year? why wasn't your party what it should have been this year? >> obviously there are a lot of foolish mistakes and that 48% of the american people thing that he did. most of the mistakes were mistakes made by candidates on the
crowd? it's almost like the civil war went the other way, and the south somehow took over the party of lincoln, not that there's anything wrong with the south, but it's certainly made your party into a right wingish party. >> well, we're not going to be a national party of social conservatives basically destroyed any possibility of people in the northeast from getting elected who are republicans. it's just not going to happen. it's not the fiscal side that's of concern to people up north. it's their social agenda, which has nothing to do with running the country. >> did you ever read the republican platform this year? you ran for office this year. did you take a look at some of the stuff in there about outright -- >> chris, you know that no congressman ever has read the platform whether they're conservative or liberal. it's the most irrelevant document, but ultimately it can hurt some people who, you know, when others read it. it doesn't tell us how to vote. it's useless. >> i read it once in a while with great pleasure because it's so absurd. it is. howard fineman, i don't know who
's right. >> you can be sure that legislators and lawmakers in new york and new jersey will be making a stink if that second part doesn't get passed. >>> at least 80 people died in civil war fighting in syria today according to opposition groups. with bloodshed increasing in the suburbs around the capital damascus. the united nations now puts the toll from almost two years of fighting at more than 60,000. meanwhile, u.s. troops have now arrived in turkey to man patriot missile defense batteries near the border. here's the latest from istanbul. >> reporter: reports emerged yesterday, turkish media saying that 27 u.s. military personnel have flown into the southern city and are about to begin sight surveillance where these patriot missile batteries should go. but it was embellished today saying they have begun the process of flying in military personnel equipment into the military base in the south of the country. that will continue in the weeks ahead. dutch, german missile batteries and military personnel also joining them as nato answers turkey's request for extra defense along that v
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)